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17 Jul

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Eliminate Taste-Specific Décor When Selling by Amy Bly

11 Jul

Great_Impressions_Home_Staging

Many homes languish for months – or even a year or more — because they have out-dated colors, materials, finishes or taste-specific décor that turn off buyers.

If you want to attract the most buyers possible when selling your home and get higher offers for it, eliminate:

  • patterned wallpaper and borders
  • brightly painted or tiled walls or dark walls
  • pink, green, blue, or other colorful (but out-dated) bath fixtures or tile – these can be inexpensively glazed or even painted
  • wall to wall carpeting in bright colors – and even then, if there are hardwood floors, the carpeting should be removed to show off the floors
  • strongly patterned vinyl flooring
  • floral curtains, ruffled curtains, and most patterned curtains, except for certain trendy looks like Moroccan-style or horizontal banded  floor-length drapes
  • knotty-pine paneling (painting it white is an easy solution to updating this 1970s look)
  • themed décor rooms (beach rooms, southwestern rooms, sports rooms, hunting-themed rooms, etc.) Themed rooms are unlikely to appeal to the majority of buyers and can make it difficult for buyers to picture their own things in the room and living in the room in general.
  • collections of any type (dolls, sports memorabilia, swords, etc.) because they are another distraction and are generally perceived as clutter.
  • religious articles/items/paintings
  • family photos, pet items (dishes, litter boxes, food bags), sports pennants, children’s names spelled out on walls, statuary, etc.

Since it’s hard to have an objective eye when it comes to your own home, using a stager for a consultation on how to present your home  to market it effectively can make a big difference in how quickly your home sells. Staging is a critical part of any home’s marketing plan, just like grooming yourself and dressing up in a conservative suit or dress is a part of a job interview in order to make a good first impression!

The return on investment for staging is anywhere from 200% to 600% over the last several years, according to HomeGain’s annual surveys on top improvements that sell homes. Also keep in mind that buyers tend to over-estimate the cost of even simple fixes like painting, many don’t know where to turn to to get those improvements done, or don’t have the time to make those repairs and updates. They just know they want to live in move-in ready homes and often don’t have the vision required to “see” a home differently than it looks now. Sellers who take a little extra time to eliminate personal décor and fix and update their homes for the market will almost always sell faster and for more money!

I offer free home staging consultations with Great Impressions to sellers who list their homes with me – a $200 value.

DRAD KW

 

257 E. Ridgewood Ave Ridgewood, NJ 07450

Each Office is independently owned and operated

5 Reasons To Stage your Vacant Home

28 Sep

By Amy Bly, Great Impressions Interiors/Home Staging

www.greatimpressionshomestaging.com

The Real Estate Staging Association tracked 174 homes listed for sale in 2011 and found that they lingered on the market for an average of 156 days. When those homes were staged and relisted, they sold in an average of 42 days. Here are some reasons why:

1)     Vacant homes tend to look cold and uninviting. A few pieces of furniture + area rugs and accessories such as art and florals in each room add the warmth that help buyers envision the house as a home.

2)     Empty rooms – especially particularly large or small ones – often raise questions in buyers’ minds about whether, where, and how furniture will fit and how it should be placed. This is magnified even more if the room has unusual angles or oddly-placed windows. Staging provides solutions to these dilemmas to show the home in its best light!

3)     Vacant homes can look as if they have been sitting too long on the market, conveying the impression that sellers may be desperate and that the house hasn’t been well-maintained or may have unknown issues. Furnishing a home helps give it a lived-in feeling that makes it competitive with other (furnished) homes on the market and makes it look move-in ready.

4)     Staging creates a preferred lifestyle buyers aspire to; a professional stager appeals to your target demographic by using design elements to appeal to buyers’ emotions.

5)     Since 85-90% of buyers start their home search on the internet, having attractive MLS photos on-line is critical. Furnished and decorated rooms are much more appealing to the vast majority of buyers than empty rooms!

What about cost? Staging 3 main rooms (living room, dining room, master bedroom) as well as bathrooms and kitchen with furniture, soft goods, and accessories in an average 3-bedroom, 2 bath house runs around $2,500-3,500 for 3 months. That price is always less than the cost of a price reduction!

Staging Tips To Help You Get Your Home Sold

14 Sep

What can you do to get your house sold faster and to get more money out of it when you need to sell in the current buyers’ market? How your home looks – presentation – is critical to getting top dollar for your home, along with price and marketing. When a house doesn’t present well to buyers, it’s unlikely to get the offers it should. Home owners who don’t take the time to get their homes in top shape for selling are missing out on a relatively low-cost, high-return investment that is likely to bring them much more money for their home and help them sell faster. According to HomeGain statistics (2009), a $500 investment in staging returns on average 4-5 times that amount in a higher selling price. Often, an investment of $600 to $800 for staging an occupied house returns several thousand dollars in a higher sales price; costs for staging vacant houses for the standard 3 month time frame are usually several thousand dollars due to furniture rental costs, but that investment in selling is still always less than a price reduction. Buyers will mentally mark down your asking price or move on to other properties if your home isn’t:

* Sparkling clean: What may pass for clean in our day to day lives doesn’t pass muster when it’s time to sell – think of how you would feel inspecting a stranger’s house with the idea of purchasing it if it the grout lines were dirty, if you spotted mold or mildew, if there were stains on the rugs, and if bathroom sinks, toilets, or kitchen countertops weren’t shined. Make sure windows are spotless to let in as much light as possible.

* Decluttered: Most houses considerably too much furniture and clutter, which distracts buyers and detracts from the house’s best features. For instance, if you have granite countertops covered by kitchen appliances, cutting boards, cutlery or utensils, or bottles of olive oil, buyers can’t really appreciate the beauty of the counters. Other common equity-eaters are piles of papers, knick-knacks, collectibles, toys, stacks of magazines and books, and photos, which take up space and distract buyers’ eyes from focusing on the selling points of your home. All the surfaces – walls, counters, floors, furniture – need to be seen and to shine. Homeowners tend not to see how much clutter they have because they’ve lived with it for so long. A home stager provides advice during a consult on what needs to be moved out or re-arranged.

* Depersonalized: Get rid of family photos, plaques, awards, trophies, collections. Anything that is about YOU and your personal interests or hobbies will generally prevent buyers from seeing your home as their home. These items can also distract buyers from focusing on the features of your home. Buyers need to be able to imagine them selves living in your home. Once your home is up for sale, it needs to be de-personalized and presented as a product with wide appeal to a large pool of buyers.

*In good repair: Any sign of maintenance problems, or unfinished home renovation projects, makes buyers nervous about extra money they may have to put into the house. Check out your home from front yard to back, looking for everything from loose doorknobs and rusty mailboxes to leaky faucets, chipped paint, and broken patios or railings.

* Painted in neutral colors: Colors need to be subdued and up-to-date. Current popular and trendy colors are beige, sage greens, wheat-toned yellows, gray, and creamy whites. Strong, bright, and bold colors risk turning-off too many buyers, but can be useful in accent pieces to liven up certain spaces or draw attention to special features in your home.

* Updated: Even your home’s interior furniture and finishings can work against getting the price it deserves. Outdated decor such as worn carpeting, old appliances, wallpaper borders, and out-dated shiny brass lighting or old cabinetry should be replaced or painted to reflect current design trends. Most buyers today also prefer painted woodwork instead of older, dark wood trim. Old or shabby furniture can be updated using slipcovers, pillows, and throws as an easy and inexpensive fix. Most buyers today also prefer white painted woodwork instead of older, dark wood trim; knotty pine paneling is “out” and should be painted a neutral color. Borders and wallpaper — other than trendy grasscloth or a master bedroom accent wall – should be removed.

* Finally, don’t overlook the importance of accessorizing with trendy artwork, vases with faux branches and high-quality silk flowers, trees, plants, and a few artfully placed decorative objects in each room. When I stage a home, I use on average 30 – 50 accessories, including the pillows and throws on couches and beds. Accessories provide the “wow” factor that helps buyers make an emotional connection with your home and picture themselves relaxing in a warm, inviting environment.

Amy Bly is the owner of Great Impressions Home Staging, LLC in River Vale, NJ. For more information on home staging tips and before and after photos, go to http://GreatImpressionsHomeStaging.com/ or call 201-390-4649.

Amy

201-390-4649

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5022985