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2nd Quarter New Jersey Real Estate Market Update for Bergen County

23 Jul

June_2013_Market_Update

CLICK ON THE PHOTO ABOVE TO PULL UP THE ENTIRE 41 PAGE REPORT

Bergen_County_June_2013_Sold 2

TO VIEW HOMES CURRENTLY ON THE MARKET CLICK HERE

DRAD KW257 E. Ridgewood Ridgewood, NJ 07481

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KELLER WILLIAMS VILLAGE SQUARE REALTY ROCKS!

7 Jun

KW_ROCKS

Inventory Down, Sales Up in Bergen County!

19 Mar

Inventory Down, Sales Up:  Spring Market Looks Good

Inventory Down, Sales Up: Spring Market Looks Good

Posted on 12. Mar, 2013 by  in Uncategorized

It is interesting to note as we head into the spring market, that we’re seeing the glut of active inventory in the NJMLS declining, while the number of closings is increasing.  Overall, there has been a decrease in Residential listings (single family homes, 2-4 family homes, and condos/coops/townhouses) of 22.44% from 2011 to 2012, while sold listings have gone up 12.90% in that same period.

This is in sharp contrast to what we’ve seen over the past several years.  Prior to 2005, in most instances, we witnessed an overactive market.  In 2005, inventory started to increase, and there was a decrease in the number of closings.  There was some exception in 2009 heading into 2010, when the First Time Homebuyer’s Tax Credit was in effect, but 2012 was the year we saw a significant change in both trends.

 

 

Click to see full size graph BergenStats

 

To further illustrate:  in the NJMLS market area, all four market area counties showed fewer active listings and more sold listings.  Click on the County name below for Active Inventory and Sold Listings statistics for Bergen, Passaic, Essex, and Hudson Counties.

There are also some key towns in each of these counties where this change is evident.  They include:

BERGEN COUNTY– 2011 to 2012

Cliffside Park:              25.40% decrease in active listings and a 37.80% increase in sold listings.

Montvale:                     44.64% decrease in active listings and a 43% increase in sold listings.

Ridgewood:                  29.59% decrease in active listings and a 26.15% increase in sold listings

Information from NJMLS

COME BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME ON 17 ACRES IN MAHWAH BY DAVID RADNEY

13 Oct

COME BUILD YOUR PRIVATE RETREAT ON THIS BEAUTIFUL 17 ACRE LOT. SURROUNDED BY COUNTY LAND YOU CAN TRULY ENJOY THIS WOODED OASIS. ALL STATE AND TOWN APPROVALS ON FILE ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS PURCHASE THE PROPERTY TO START YOUR DREAM HOME. APPROVED FOR 1 HOME WITH OR WITHOUT POOL. PROPERTY DOES HAVE A PORTION OF PROTECTED LAND THAT DOES NOT EFFECT THE BUILDING ENVELOPE.

Campgaw in Mahwah, NJ by David Radney

7 Oct

 

Campgaw Mountain extends for three miles approximately north to south along the border of Franklin Lakes, Oakland, and Mahwah. The peak of the mountain rises to 752 feet (229 meters)[1] in Mahwah, becoming the fourth highest peak of Watchungs, though the height of the mountain as measured from its base is generally less than 400 feet (122 meters). A shallow gap exists between Campgaw Mountain and the Preakness and Goffle Hill ranges of the Watchungs to the south, somewhat isolating the ridge from the rest of the Watchung Mountains despite contiguous geology below the surface. In the north, the mountain terminates at the Ramapo Fault, the western border of the Newark Basin. Campgaw Mountain also marks the eastern edge of the Ramapo River Valley, forming a sizable basin between itself and the Ramapo Mountains.[6]

An unusual trait of Campgaw Mountain is that it is composed of the ridges of both First and Second Watchung Mountain. Fyke Brook, a tributary of the Ramapo River, divides the two ridges, running northwest through a narrow valley along the northeastern corner of the mountain. Second Watchung Mountain comprises the majority of Campgaw Mountain at the surface.

Before the arrival of Europeans, Campgaw Mountain was inhabited by Munsee (Minsi) Lenape. Evidence of the Lenape presence around Campgaw can be found in a former village that existed on the north side of the mountain, along the south bank of the Ramapo River.[7] Reflecting on this Native American heritage, the mountain is named for a Lenape chief, Kum-Kow, with the name Campgaw being a modern variation of the original spelling.[8][9] Taken literally, the syllables in the name Kum-Kow probably translate to goose-hedgehog.[10][11]

An historical account from 1834 indicates that Campgaw Mountain’s summits were once under extensive cultivation.[12] This would seem to explain the numerous stone walls, apparently former property boundaries, running through the woods along the mountain. Another historical work from 1894 detailing New Jersey’s forests shows that Campgaw Mountain was covered by a nearly unbroken expanse of chestnut, oak, and redcedar[13], indicating that cultivation along the ridgeline may have declined by that time. Campgaw Mountain was essentially wilderness in 1960 when property on the ridge was taken by the Bergen County Park Commission to create Campgaw Mountain Reservation. The park, which opened in June 1961, forced many of the Ramapough Mountain Indians inhabiting Campgaw Mountain and the surrounding area off their land.[14]

In addition to the development of the park, Campgaw Mountain saw the construction of a Nike missile base during the height of the Cold War. Installed on the mountain between 1955 and 1971, the base’s missiles served to guard New York City’s air space, standing by to intercept nuclear armed Soviet bombers. The facility was ultimately abandoned with the advent of intercontinental ballistic missiles.

information courtesy of Wikipedia