Tag Archives: david radney

The kitchen that Chefs dream about!

23 Feb

 

Just  a quick look at the Kitchen in my new listing in Franklin Lakes.  The house will be Open Sunday Feb 28th 1-4pm.  Pass this on  if you know someone looking to buy a great home.

David

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Lake View home in Upper Greenwood Lake (150 Point Breeze drive West Milford, NJ)

7 Jan
THIS 4 BEDROOM 1 BATH RANCH HOME IS LOCATED ON THE ISLAND SECTION OF UGL. AMAZING LAKE VIEWS OF UPPER GREENWOOD LAKE FROM THE KITCHEN,DINING ROOM AND LIVING ROOM. THE LARGE FAMILY ROOM IS BEING USED AS THE MASTER BEDROOM. NEWER FURNACE & CENTRAL AIR. NEWER ROOF. STONE FIREPLACE. OIL TANK IN BASEMENT. FULL UNFINISHED BASEMENT. LAKE RIGHTS TO UPPER GREENWOOD LAKE: BEACH, MOTOR BOATING, WATER & JET SKIING, CLUBHOUSE, LIFEGUARD. YEAR AROUND COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES. 25 MINUTES TO MAJOR SKI AREA.                                                     

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Don’t miss out on this Lakefront Bi-Level in West Milford, NJ

7 Jan

 Photo below shows your private beach to Mount Laurel Lake off the backyard.

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THIS LOVELY LAKE FRONT BI-LEVEL WAS BUILT IN 2002 AND HAS 3 BEDROOM AND 3 FULL BATHROOMS . THE DINING ROOM/ KITCHEN GIVES YOU ACCESS TO ONE OF THE DECKS THAT OVERLOOKS YOUR PRIVATE BEACH ACCESS TO MOUNT LAUREL LAKE. THERE IS ANOTHER DECK OFF THE LOWER LEVEL THAT GIVES YOU THE SAME VIEW AND DIRECT ACCESS TO THE BACKYARD, BEACH AND LAKE. UNLIKE THE TRADITIONAL BI-LEVEL THIS HOME ALSO HAS A FULL FINISHED BASEMENT FOR ADDITIONAL LIVING SPACE. THE HOME HAS GENEROUS SIZED ROOMS AND THE LOWER LEVEL HAS AN ADDITIONAL ROOM THAT CAN BE AN OFFICE OR BEDROOM. YOU JUST HAVE TO SEE IT! SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WHILE ITS STILL AVAILABLE.

 

David Radney Keller Williams

Beautiful Historic Colonial for sale in Waldwick, NJ

16 Dec

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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THIS HISTORIC COLONIAL, ON A DOUBLE LOT, WAS ORIGINALLY BUILT BY THE HOPPER FAMILY. THE RENOVATED EAT-IN KITCHEN HAS CUSTOM CABINETS, HIGH-END STAINLESS STEEL APPLIANCES AND A PROFESSIONAL 6 BURNER BLUE STAR GAS RANGE. HARDWOOD FLOORS THROUGHOUT. THE SPACIOUS LIVING ROOM HAS ELABORATE CROWN MOLDING AND A WOOD BURNING FIRE PLACE. THERE ARE 5 BEDROOMS AND 3 FULL BATHS, 2 OF WHICH ARE NEW HIGH END CONTEMPORARY DESIGNS. UPSTAIRS IS AN ADDITIONAL ROOM THAT IS PERFECT FOR AN OFFICE/NURSERY /HOBBY ROOM. THE LARGE DINING ROOM HAS AN EXIT TO A SIDE PATIO. THERE IS A FAMILY ROOM OFF THE DINING ROOM. THE BUS STOP FOR NYC IS ON THE SAME STREET AND THE TRAIN STATION IS WITH-IN WALKING DISTANCE. THIS IS THE HOUSE YOU WILL CALL HOME!

 

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Your student loan is killing the housing market

14 Oct

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Millennials already have to deal with hefty debt from college, an iffy job market, and growing up in an era where MTV no longer plays music videos, but now they’re being blamed for holding back the real estate boom. Home builder adviser John Burns Consulting published details from a study earlier this month concluding that student loan payments will cost the housing industry 414,000 transactions this year that would have totaled $83 billion in sales.

Ouch. The ivory tower is crumbling at the foundation.

It’s been widely assumed that mounting student debt is eating away at this otherwise buoyant housing market recovery. John Burns Consulting’s study — boiled down to a free one-pager for those that aren’t paying customers that got the more thorough report — attempts to quantify the impact.

How did the adviser arrive at $83 billion? Well, we start with the 5.9 million households under the age of 40 that are paying at least $250 in student loan debt, nearly triple the 2.2 million leveraged college grads in the same predicament back in 2005. We then get to the assumption that $250 earmarked for student loan debt every month reduces the buying power of a potential home buyer by $44,000. That’s bad, and it’s naturally worse depending on how much more than $250 a month some of these indebted students have taken on to pay back. That’s less money they can commit to a mortgage. John Burns Consulting offers up that most households paying at least $750 a month in student loan have priced themselves out of the housing market entirely.

It gets worse

The study only looked at folks between the ages of 20-40. That’s a pretty sizable lot, especially since 35% of all households in that age bracket have at least $250 a month in student debt. However, even John Burns Consulting concedes that there’s “a big chunk of households over age 40 who have student debt” as well. It’s not likely to be as bad, naturally, but it’s all incremental at this point.

This report also happens to come at a time when the housing industry is starting to flinch after a couple of years of boom and bounce. Right now everything seems great. New home sales data released this past week showed the industry’s highest monthly growth rate in more than six years. However, the near-term outlook is starting to get hazy.

Shares of KB Home (KBH) shed more than 5% of its value on Wednesday after reporting uninspiring quarterly results. Revenue and earnings fell short of expectations, and the same can be said about its number of closings and order growth. Earlier this month it was luxury bellwether Toll Brothers (TOL) setting an uneasy tone after posting a year-over-year decline in the number of contracts it signed during the period and an uptick in the cancellation rate for existing home orders.

It gets better

The student debt crisis is real, and the skyrocketing costs of obtaining a post-secondary education naturally open up the debate of its necessity. However, it’s also important to remember that university grads are earning far more than those that don’t attend college.

The median of annual earnings for young adults in 2012 was $46,900 for those with a bachelor’s degree, $30,000 for those with just a high school degree or credential and $22,900 for those who did not complete high school. Those going on to grad school for advanced degrees — and that’s where student loans can really start to pile up — are at $59,600 a year.

In other words, most college grads, and especially grad school graduates, are typically better off than those that didn’t pursue higher education, even with the student loan albatross around their white-collared necks. The housing industry would be better off if colleges were cheaper or if student debt levels were lower, but the same can be said about purchasing power in general. At the end of the day, debt-saddled or not, the housing industry needs its college graduates.

Rick Munarriz, The Motley Fool 9:33 a.m. EDT October 5, 2014

 

Your student loan is killing the housing market.